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Accidental Parenting
Accidental Parenting

Episode 9 · 1 year ago

S01E8: City Life

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The perks and drawbacks of having kids in the city vs. the suburbs. Amy Webb from This Little Miggy shares details about her newly published children's book When Charley Met Emma.

I've got a bit of a thrilback fortoday's episode. Do you remember where we were living in January of twothousand and nine Yeah New York City, New York City, so in January, on thefifteenth to be exact of two thousand a nine? This is when flight fifteen fortynine took off from Liguardia and hit a flock of as out of Thi Story. Socaptain silly was ou the movie eventually and he ended up landing theplane in the Hudson River in the Huddson river would which s see fromour apartment. We were right off the Hudson exactly, and I was thinkingabout this the other day, the flock of Yese that he ha he hit him around whenhe was over the Bronx Zoo and he couldn't turn around so he had to landin the Hudson. Do you remember where there were a ton of geese near where welived? Yes, that park across the river yeah? It was in Fort Lee call. It wascalled Ross Duck Picnic area, and it was this great little picnic area.Actually, the the movie big, the the beginning scene, where they're at theCarne and whatever an he harmil ti machine yeah that was sa Mermoros docpicnic area in Fortle, New Jersey and we'd love to take our kids there, butit was always tricky. Gre Only went once. Actually I only rememberi. Weonly went once because it was so tricky to navigate all the GOOSEPOOP. It wasin the cover in Goosepoo and our oldest used to say, Hey, look out becausethere's going to be some mother, goose poop, there e he call it mother Gos. Itwas always mother, goose, popimy. Today we're going to be talking about citylife versus what living in the suburbs. Yes, Yeahso on today's POG GUAST I'llbe talking to amy webb from this little miggie about her children's book. AhCity life and accessibility. We knew them when we both lived in New YorkCity parenting in the city was such a different experience from Barenting inthe suburbs. It was so when we moved there and we had a bit of a differentscenario. I was the stay at home, Dad for the two years that we were there.Our first year we lived in a two bedroom apartment and Hudson Heights,and we didn't have a car, and that was very difficult, navigating strollersand subways and stairs and you' have bags and bags of groceries and groceryha weather the snowis just really hard to do. Myact on theres plus a strolleryeah. After a year we decided to downgrade we moved from a two bedroomto a one bedroom and decided to get a car. Our bed was in the living room andthe kids were in the Medraad we treated at like a studio for ourselves and thengive the kids, the bedroom and having that car was was game, changer or MyeSanity. It helped me to get out of the city, especially in the in thewintertime. I could take them to a shopping mall or to a park and justable to to navigate a little bit more, and even once we had that car there wasinconveniences like street parking. You HAV trew like sent an alarm to move thecar when the streew Jong cleaned and y. sometimes we would get home late atnight and there was no parking anywhere, but he would be like circling the blockforever. Looking for a spot and at times that was too my benefit. Do youremember who I met when I was waiting to find a parking spot outside of ourbuilding Hellboy Hellboy Crud? His name is Ron Perlman. We hadto pause and Google that dionest I ried. I tried to make it sound, really smoothtn, I'm going to be honest here, yeah, so Ron, paroman Hellboy, also mom livedin La from sons of anarchis, like mom lived on our building and he'd come toto visit her and one time I I dropped the kids off in Andaubry and went to gopark and there was no parking, so I sat out in front of our building for a bitand he came out smoking a big cigar. So I chatted with him for a few months. Ntguythnothing, like you, would expect right 'cause. He usually plays thevillain or, like this meangraft Giben, he was a great guy so living in thecity. The parking was a pain. I ended up sitting timers and were moving andleaving to go into New Jersey so that I didn't have to double park and figurethat that whole mess out. That's a lot more convenient. Now that we live inthe suburbs, I'm telling you, after two years of living in the city as a stayat home, Dad, I I told ar I can't do this anymore. Let's figure outsomething and that's something for US ended up being moving back out west,where there was space yef I mean for me. I can go to the grocery store, fill mycar with groceries and then park in my garage and Y and now the groceries anand we've Afridge with space athingell. Not just one grocery store, you can doHOSSCOSCO target oe trades anywhere, you want is all within a three mileradius itis. Just so convenient y have increciated a lot more having lived inthe city, those conveniences, I'm grateful for it. A lot of lot of peoplemight not even think about how easy it is here well outside of the navigatingcity life. Your Your Group of friends,...

...your network and the city becomes sodifferent right. We had playdate groups and we had preschool groups that we'dtake all the kids too, and those people really become your family, because,when you're living in New York City chances are your family isn't anywherenear, and that was really cool for us, a d and the webs who Abri willinterview amy in just a few moments. She became part of that network for usand it was a lot of fun. Let's start the interview with any web here, TISHAV we go in amy, good obby. Who are you doing? I'm excellent? Thank you somuch Bor joining us today, I'm so excited. I know it's been a while,since we chatet, so I'm really happyt S, we ere just traling, to know about howI feel like we chat every day, because I follow he on social media right we'retiing, even though it's pro like you, said it's probably been over a detaeexactly since we actually talked nice to catch up. Yes, so do you liketo start interviews with an awkwardly personal question? So I'm going to askyou: what is the craziest thing you ever did out of sleep over m o goodquestion, so this particular thing I did wasn't so crazy, but sort of like hhow the events played out was a little bit crazy, so in middle school it wasjust given that if I sloved over at my one friend's house, we went out andteapied you know Oyan all the night like that was just given that we woulddo that. And so my friend of aunt and I went outdoing our usual thing wandering around her neighborhood wondering who weshould hit and- and it wasn't a mean spirit thing for us- It was like a fun.You know we usually just did people's hous like lot of I. We did older kidsthat, like in high school evening, really now Firsur and it was just forfun as funnys Si. It wasn't ever like to be mean young, spirited and stuff.So today, one night we're like. Oh: Let's go, let's go get Amy Powell'shouse, you know she was a great older than us. We knew her KINDOF, not superwell, but she, you know we had some other mutual friends. So we startedteaping or House. It's like two in the morning. You know, I think, I'm ineighth grade and all of a sudden, the front dwarf flies open and this mancomes running out and we are terrified, yeah, 'c E. Idon't know cing like I know any powl, I new nothing about our family. I nontShehav, oer Brothers, ISS, her dad and my friend Um there's just two of us and my French.You Know Ma she starts running and, and he I ean, he is like booking itafter us. This I N is grown adult man, so she eventually stoppd I catch up toher and se to on. She cause please until my parents, dos UN tol, myparents e so to my parents and he's like okay girls come on. Let's go,let's go clean this up and I mea we get over there to his house. So this is thedad and the wife outside and she's, like oh girls. What are you guys doing?Don't you? Everyone knows, I'm the lightest sleeper in the neighborhoodand we're like sorry yeah like that's awkward and the DAD's like go. Get thegirls up, go, get the girls up and were like no Egot, the girlsand again like all inthose, as are like the girls. Does she have a sister like who is the then?Eventually they do get the girls up and it's AIAN. She had a friend Siping overand Oy, so my maid name is Gek, which was which in high school a lot ofpeople called me Geek as like as like a nickname man. Couldn't they go withlike Gecko get better than a an I just get. I old or bad gek was, but it waslike it wasn't again. It wasn't mean as my pep new me and Um, and so we're out there, cleaning upthes thing and and ae te girl be kind of no comes out with her friend who'ssleeping over and shew's like Kak. What are you doing were like sory, O Berter all out there like two in themorning, cleaning up and they're like you, girls want to come inside for atest seat and we're like sure and bite us inside, and we just likehung out shooting the breez oin a sleep over yeah LTO in the morning like aparent and they're telling? U stor gain going o know, everyone knows she's thelight. Ost sleeer you don't you don't keep you canot Tal Ei, Lo and and thenit was just like two thirty three they're, like alright yougirls o get onYor way, no more trouble for you tonight, an they just like send us outhe door, and we were just like. Oh, my God, what just O ae out? I actuallyhave a very similar story. Only it did not end as well. We were really twietPaperin deepbeing somebody honest over and they've caught us, but we had cutupall these newspaper we had like shredded newspaper and sprinkled it ontheir grass, which is a little more aspirited thinking Bai. Why did I dothat? LIHT? An I think that was okay. I...

...mean now I rated but still, and theparents caught us. They did not look up the kids. They made us pick up everylittle piece of shredded newspaper and it took forever and it was soembarrassing just to get cahey not invite us in for Nice Chat. That was a twist of the story and wewere. We were still injutery about like getting caught and feeling Reay Ora.You know and like yeah, so unexpected that they would be so funny and chillabout it and we're still meanwile like yeah yeah. I isin glad I'm glad they took itbetter. I'm Gad you hadn't shretded up newspaper because o they might nolittlemore apset. They night have been more of set. Yeah so amy and I were friendsin New York City. We both lived there at the same time when we had just brandnew babies, brand new toddlers, and we were like new MOMS figuring it out andfiguring out life in the city with kids, yes, and since then we both we bothmoved it about the same time. I think you guys left about a year before us.We left in two thousand and ten, and I think you e at it before that right,yeah, weer, two douser name yeah. I e read about the same time and since then,we've both like moved around and kind of totstayd idn't Havh to be a socialmedia, but I'm an Intero you by making a few assumptions. I like to do thisand then, if I'm wrong, just correct me and tell me what the truth is oo, I'mgoing to say you grew up in California, Colorado ooh. I was kind of far off onthat one yeah your first job was a game attendant atthe county. Fair, very close. I worked at the gap. Ohthat is so close. Very close. I think it'd be more fun tobe a game attendant, but also like not it's actually much more impressive,that you were able to get a nice retail job for your first, I was proud ofmyself. Fus Sur treally beats mine, which was in apotato factory. That is awesome not as glamorous, though for Sur. Okay, I wantto say for breakfast, you usually eat yogurt, True Yeah Yi got it Mi yogertand a protein Shak good for you. I lately always end up eating. My kidsleft over half eaten toast. After I get back from dropping them off or like ahi otand bull of boat meal yeah. I not my kids garbatge disposal. I knothat rule up for myself a long time to trow it away. Why am I doing that? I'mbill tree to adopt amy, I'm stopping as of today, because but time I'm likethat was gross it's just like I have this. It's like it's like. I grew up inthe depression area where you don't want to waste food that Isyeah. No, myhusband has this sane Yat yep does hehis fanilins over toy. His mom wasraised by her Gro Group and the depression, and so she will like it'slike the joke that she eats wrong food. That's funny! Yeah I mean that's me hat.I tell him. I was raised by grandparents togrip in the deression,like I liv to my grindfriends as a kid, and I don't believe ind, I don't. Ihave to adopt a practices ia going to eat what I want for breakfast and thisyogurt and perching Chik is much healthier and better. For me, yes, okay! Well, I want to talk about yourbook. First of all, you recently had a beautiful children's book publishedwhen Charley met Emma. Can you tell us about it why you decided to write it?Yes, the book is called in Charlie Maemma. It is about a little boyinCharley who goes to the park one day and he sees a girl who's reallydifferent. Like he's somethin stills different, but I guess in the park- andhe sees this girl, she doesn't have any hands and she also uses a wheel chairand he is like. Woe, like his mind, is blown by this, and so he kind of saysthis loud and comfortable thing to his mom he's like. Why does she look soweird? And then you kindaf have this moment where the mom's, like, Oh crap,you know what I, what do I do here and she kinda guise him through. Like Hey.That's that's not nice, you don't use Adam and then he she invites him to goover and introduced himself to Emma and they kind of start. This littlefriendship and they talk about why she's different M, you know, but whyshe's also alike and and this little friendship is- is born an and there's like a mantre in the book.That kind of serves s like the base foreverything and it says different, isn't weird, sad, bad or strange. Differentis different and different as great and m. So the book came about because Ihave three daughters and my middle daughter who online nd on my Blogainstogram her her name is is lamp, but I thout her real name like hate whenpeople think that's her actual real name as much as I I wan to be likeprivate, my kids, I'm also like her name, isn't really and she actually hasa beautiful name and so yeah len is not her name beautiful, regular humanperson, yes M so, but she was born with indifferences like the character, emathere're a lot the same, but I mean she knows that the character is based onher, but it is Sefarat from her. They have different personalities, differentinterests, Yeah B M, but you know she.

She presents very differently to theworld and she alsos e Wheeltar user. Her legs are, you know much shorterthan typical. She doesn't have most of her left arms. It's really short, it'sm. It kind of like a Nuggoro stug people would say, and then her rightarm is a little bit longer, but it goes to about where most people's elbowswould be in thentheres. A small hand tit's different from most people'shands, but it's in I itstat she's had three fingers kind of fuse altogether.That's just to give people sort of avidual of my daughter, and so I wrote the book Um, because thatexperience is something we've lived, dozens and dozens of times, Um and and it you know, you know just like parenting in general,you're figuring it out, and it's all new at the beginning and how you are.When you first have a kid. You know you're a very different parent. Now, atleast I am you know, twelve years into this gage than I was in the firstYearyoh for same for all of us for sure, right and and the same thing whenyou're, a parent of a Childhoo's, a disability Um. So at the beginning everything was new.There was a lot about disability in general. That was like fascinating tome. It was interesting to watch my daughter learn how to use this bodythat was so different and to watch her Um. You know she doesn't. She doesn'thave you know, pposible thumbs and, for the most part like I said she has ahand, but it's you know different T, an other people's hands so what she saysif she doesn't have gribbing hands and so for her. She uses for all herfinemotiv skill. She uses her feet, she rigdts to the feet. She draws with herfeet and Um, and it was all really fascinating and an the beginning of theJur of this. You know R, our life with her it was. I was seen everything fromthe point of view, as as I have my whole life of an able budy person and over the course of her life Um, you know those early years. I startedto well well, first, we were just orhaving experiences like that that were so common and I didn't often know howto react or Haw. I you know I I always wanted to give children like thiseducation, Bat. I also wanted to like hold a sign up everywhere. We went justto tell people how to lihe treat us just like you know it's hard to alwaysbe an educational load and but somewhere along the way. I I sort ofreally started coming around to the idea that, like oh we're, we'reprejudiced against people' disabilities and I started interviewing people, myblog, you know now I've done like over twoand thirty interviews. That was a big part of my education into disabilityand disavility, where it is and to be on a Yore blog about it has been a hugeeducation for me. I was the same. I had very little awareness and every time Iread one of your interviews, it's so enlightening like I'm learning so much,and I have a better idea of of what I should be thinking and feeling andsaying- and it's so been just wonderful, I'm so glad to hear tha an ithing isits like Wan people understand like I came from this perspective at thebeginning of doing that. I started the Glo when she was about a year old kindof thinking like Oh. These are these. Are My people we're going to tell youall what's up and I realize very quickly like? Oh, I don't know anythinglike I'm in the same about as everyone else. I have a daughter WHO's disabled,but I you know still very ablest which, if people don't know that terits, it'slike the discrimination people with Hisbili experience hough instead oflike racist, they experience, abilism, heving sot of racism or something likethat. They experience ablism, and so I S I was coming from that standpoint and one of one of the big awakenings in ThiJourney. An process for me was realized that the reason children react that way.Oftentimes is because- and of course I knew this attime like. Oh, they don'tknow any better because they don't. They haven't seen anyone like her nbefore, of course they haven't seemed like her, but the realization was like.Oh, they haven't seen anyone like her, because we don't have kids like her inthe media in the world roubs. We don't have kids, like my daughter on our TVshows in or advertising or in our children's book books, and so it was sort of this likegreater wareness of my holy crap, like we've scrubbed the world of disabledbodies, and that's one of the reasons kids react so strongly R. They see itso rarely right and it's like C nd, and I can understand when you don't setyour everyday life m. You know my kids go to small school, there kind ofexposed to the same kids all the time. A and that's one thing, but again likethis. Greater idea of like of representation, really hit me hardand so so yeah. I wanted to write the book to really up that representationfor my daughter for other kids, like her for able body kids who who whodon't know and want to be exposed for...

...parents who want to tase their children about disabilitybut like don't know how and don't know where to start and so y. It was likeall of that. So many recently. Yes, all that wassort of like why I I decided Ri Tostok and then, of course, even the verybasic of like what do you do when you're out and about and you're meeting you know, you're introduced your childCaes, a kitten who's disabled. How do you handle that that Um that situation,which which is k the situation the book plays out? Well, I know that everyone Ihave recommended it to loves it. An they've all been able to havemeaningful conversations with their kids about it. As did I- and I knowwe're not the only ones. What has the response been to the book? It's beenamazing like it that's a cool thing about like writing a book. You Know Ecause I'vebeen blogging, for I don't know fourteen years, and that was how I usedto try to get my messages out there in the world. But the difference of havinga bulk is like you K, ow, it's this thing you hold and it's this tangibleobject. That's in your house and the illustration it something I can give aschool and I can give a friend and ray and and that and people love children'sbooks. I mean who doesn't want to give their kid another book I mean you knowit's like we have so many toys and junk and stuff that we fill our houses upwith. But, like you know, good book, I feel like everyone well, especiallywhen they'e illustrated beautifully, which yours really is like that. I meanthe message: YEA is so powerful, but also you just look at it and it'sbeautiful someone might pick it up off the shelf just because of that notrealizing anything about it and that and I'm so glad you brought that up. Sothe illustrator Um is merrily. Liddier she's deserves a huge shotu oftheatalenties she's amazing and I knew her before and when I had the idea todo the book. I like met her two days later and like immediately had thislike. Oh my gosh she's, who I want to illustrate my book. This is notcoincidence, h yeah, it was, and so that's kind of a whole other Stok, butbut I was very um purposeful and new for the beginning. I want this be abeautiful book because against so often T it's the sad truth that, likedisability and good design and beauty are like notseen on the same spectrum, Oh and that, like the disability, nhe gets tishaftwhen it comes to o design and those things, and so it was really importantto me that this was like hod to be avaiful Boan, I'm glad you love that,but but the respons, if raw, it's just it's kind. Amazing like I get Um, youknow one of the main ways I I hear back about it as all my instragram, sopeople will tag me in their post or in their Um. You know, they'll put a storyup about it or share something or just rigtnmea DM, and you know I mean, on the one hand it's like I'm hearingback from other kids, maybe with lindifferences like I, you know, Seenga picture that Sene UPUs on face book, a bare daughter. Reading the book withher feet was like so amazing because it was like she waslike you know. The MOM was like she's, never seen herself in a book beforelike we could just cry, you know and that to finally see herself representedthat's and that's huge, and even if a child isn't disable specific way. That EA isbecause not most t children aren't. You know, rightbut to have something that'svery physically different. I think that a lot of kids who do have a disability,especially if they preser relate to thatvery differently, relate to thatand he's a wheelchair user. So a lot of kids, you know an wheelchairs reg,regardless of having lindifferences or not so there's that whe's that side toit. That has been wonderful to hear and then the other side, like you and otherfamilies who m just like just reading a book they've, their kthat has justopened up like such good questions for their kids and just a good opportunityto talk about this and Tafo th. The like almost like the hidden trick of the bitis like the book is intended to help. You know what to do if, like okay, ifyou're out and Abou and you you meet someone who's disabled, your kids mayas well as to say ther for the first time. What's the best way to handle it,but like the real thing is, is you're having the discussion in your housebefore thet er in a et? Yes before I have a chance to say something thatmight mean Andsor Al already been exposed to it in a way that a lot oftimes we we haven't before EA, because I was you know before I had my midtledaughter, I was a mom of of a little girl, whos typicul and I did't havethose conversations with her. I didn't think about it Y. No, I notice like tobe a parent and not think about that that until you're in the situation andthen Oh Tein, on Te, I what do I do. What do I do? Yes, yes, and so that youknow that Responsas Ben Awso, I think one of my favorite storys, someone toldme they said I just I just Hav to tell you you know: We've. We Love Your Bookand K O my son, we've read it a lot of times and we were at the park the otherday and there was a little boy there M, with a loom difference, and my son ranright up to him and was like you have a Lim difference. That's so cool and shesaid the Lam was just done. She said...

...'cause, her son was five years old, a d.She said in five years. We have never had a child, one used the term Lim toFrend and two run out to hem and excited boutiges aid. Most kids call itFreat, Caln, creepy or weird, and they like back away and so to have ju havehad that hat big of a tiingeperience with me. I just think k just makes me Mone pregas I justthinke ye like and that's the power of representation. You know for Fer thatthat is the power of representation, and especially when you present in apositive light and youteach and educate kids it just it can completely shiftthe whole narrative. Yes, and even if that were the only positive experiencethat came from the book, would be a win but yeer able, with this book to reachsuch a bigger scale like a lot of people, have been yehazeded and thereand have these conversations and O it's amazing, I'm so I love it andit's a beautiful, but thank you think it is it's fun to see it like. It justcontinues to GE, spread out in the world n. that's what's so fun about it!Yeah! It's like I. You know it's been out since March and it's still fun tohear stories and People's experiences and were did actually just when Turlinmet Emma just won the Gold Metal Moonbeam Children's Book Aword in thecompassion category, which is awesome that I ei h. what's it been like tohave it recognized like that, I mean you know. I think I sercen like not theterintopof e ilitarie. It was like the chocolate on top, but yeah I mean honestly, you know it's it's awesome, it's sowonderful obviously be recognized and I feel like I'm going to be someone likeat an Awar chows like it's just you know just to be reognized. If hecategory is amazed is a gift enough. You know bt, but it's true like for me.I like just to t to get the book published. You knowwhat I mean like Ju Bron someas. It was like a tw. It was a two year process.You know I rinning the book Um to actually getting a publisher. You knowso so to have EO, so Honestin justeverylittle thing extra long way, really feels like like. Like extra, I meanit's wonderful, but it's also like just doing the book and in general, has therecognition that thomeone wanted to publish it and market it and get it out.There was yeah. Yooe word is amazing, but also just the fact that people arereading it and loving it like that. Recognition really every day is y,better right, fs yeah yeah. So I you know, we talked about your thedisability spotlight, which I've always read, and so I was kind of sad whenthere's a little bit of a Haatis, but I get it with life and everything happen.But I read that you started a pack up which I'm excited about for anyone,who's listening who's not familiar with it. Can you let them know kind of whatit is and where they confined it yeah. So, if you go to my blog, which iscalled this little miggi stayed home, it's Miggy, I have a section called wood, says:difficulity, spotlight, nowwen. It used to be the specially spotlight Um. SoI've recently I'm kind of changing my verbage here M, and so you can eat.There's a tap atte tops o. You can read it there. I have and it as proud t. Youknow I probably do need to udate it because, like I, you know everyoneswanted to add the most of the most current ones, and so it's probably thelist I have. There may no be Turrn, but likelook Oug, my Blod, it's all there,but, but even so I mean there's over so there's reall, two hundred and thirtyinterviews and it really started out in the beginning.It was mostly me interviewing other parents of kids of disabilities andthat's still like probably the largest demographic, that's on there right, butbut now I really hope that I I'm able to get more and then eventually sorry,I'm kind of like jumping round here it started out that lay, but eventually Idid start interviewing, like adults from a first hand perspective and thatreally Wen. So much of my education shifted. You know because I it is onething to hear and it's a valuable respective to hear the story of aparent who's going this road, and suddenly you have this. This curer ballthat you don't expect and, like me, like, you learn a lot about life. Youstart to see life in a new ones hat it's an entirely different thing tohear about someone who w o has lived this experience, both the time fromwhen they were children, and to tell you what what it's like to live in aworld built for and by able body people and not fit that that H, that not jusonote anmal, yes enough it. Iremember actually the first one 'cause. It was like moms with kids Wer, and Iremember the first one where you were interviewing someone who had actuallyexperienced it themselves than it was kind of mind. Boing like oh OK. This issuch and for them to sh, be willing to share such personal details and reallyhow they were experiencing. It themselves was, was extremely powerful,yeah and so ththose are Um, some of my favorite ones, and so I've started itback up again and really you know the...

...hyitis was it was a Blo Heydisingeneral and I've kind of Steppin way a little bit from from doing the blog asmuch just time and life and seasons Woer, you've got kids. You've got alittle busy and M, but I, but I I do want to still do the spotlight justbecause it I mean without the spotliht like the book one exists, you know I Iwouldn't have. I I think a lot of people maybe would assume that, like myavocacy kind, O in the things I speak about stem from, just being my you know,having my daughter and really my avatacy really is the spotlight andthen I think anything else I do have done on top. That really has stune fromthat has done from that awareness on that knowledge, and I Iwas a aboutfifty fifty, you know from being the mother of a daughter's disability toalso reading and learning from all these people and all these differentexperiences and wel. I wanted to ask you about Um. You know you and yourhusband have lived in many different places and Y. I'm curious how thosecities compare in two ways: First M, just in in having kids and havingthings to activities to do with them and then also as far as accessibility.You know how of the citys compared and and if you can briefly talk about, Iknow you have kind of created like the dream accessible home, which isprobably making your current city feel more accessible just because your homeis but yeah tse, Athot Yeahokay, so we've lived in New York, city,Cincinnati and San Antonio and as a family, and we currently live inCincinnati. So I loved just freaking love New York City. I don't know ifhe's o the same way, I Iye, I still miss it. I Bon at like my Armhas, beencut off. It will always be in my blood. I will always let city I got to go backtwice this past year recently and it's I love it. Does it feel like you'regoing home, like you, don't feel like you're, a tourist anymore rigyeah? No,no! I Don'. I love it and especially 'cause. I I still stay with. You knowwe're in in headyeah where we used to live and stuff, and so that's reallyfun M, but it is. We did take lamp there once when shewas like a baby, and so this was prey wheel, chair prealled, that M it's a nightnervous city foraccessibility, and I remember hating the strollers up and downstairs andever elevator he can knoll Opel. Yes, the word can speak to that as, likemothers who had you, know Olero, because you 'case accessibility isn'tjust for peoples, Hi cars, it's for so many different situations and yeah thestores I mean. I still couldn't believe like you just carry it. You know likepricl. Sho is what happens here right and Um, and so as much as I would loveto like Sumday live there again. I can't really stab in that. That beingsaid, I know that they're doing a huge uh. You know now that they're having toupdate a lot of these subways. I know that there's going to be a huge push.Someone emailed me some article about, like you, know, like changing a lot of it to make itmore accessible. There would be NACE thit should be great right, Um, butI'll alwa always aneit' it's easily, my favorite city in the world. Yes and then Santantonio the great thingabout San Antonio Um, when I think of accessibility is, Ijust think of the weather, because wheelcairs Um in general do not go wellwith snow, so m and a D so and then for our daughter,because she uses her feet m as her hands Um. She doesn't wear she's in Sox.Very often I an she wears them when it's cold and, like you know, whenshe's going to school like right now that it's the weather stange turns likeshe wears them two school in the morning, but then like in school,they're off the whole day. You know m because thatsh she's writing an she'sdoing stuff with him and then and then, when she comes home or she does outside.You know they might be back on, but even then a lot of times aaltis likereally col watching she still has the law, and so that was anicething ThautSan Antonio. It was just like she could always have no shoes and she couldalways be like Um, pretty free that way. PT. I agat like that. Hare yeah, likewithout the major Um without snow and stuff 'cause 'cause. We got herwheelchair when we lived in San Antonio, her first fhiel chair, and so so it wasnice en not senseof. Like N, remember thinking, Lik Itkind to be here longterm, because you know the weather would be good for uccessibility and actually a lot. You know w an Ithink about it too, and I didn't think about it. Then a lot of houses. Thereare one story: Ranches I mean people don't have basens in San Antonio, typically right, and so so in thatsense too, that I didn't even think about that because th that, as we 'relearning, is one of the harder parts of...

...accessibilities, obviously there'sstill public spaces, but it's actually private residences that you feel morerestricted the older they get because you can't go in certain people's housesmm m an in Cincinnati, so Cincinnati is a little bit in the middle. I mean anand it's definitely nowhere near New York City as being bad, but it's Um.You know, because you know, there's not a subway system here, we'renotwe're,not IIN. Anout of ACAR right, and so we yeah exactly so we have a an accessibleDan, but the treating thing that Cincinnatiis the thing I love is at is a really old city and it's beautiful and it'sgot beautiful old architectures got beautiful old homes. The first house we bought W. Weactually lived here twice and Uewe did Residentseeng that we left and then weum for San Atuna and then we came back afterwards and our first house here wasgorgeous like three story: Victorian, and that was like ninety six years oldat the time and those are everywhere here and they're, beautiful, butthey're, so Dang and accessible, no yeah, good luck, getting upstairs dont, then, and then just a lot of thebuildings here, because so Incinciani has the largest urban historiicdistrict in the country, I believe or second largist, and so it's m againbeautiful downtown. But you have a lot of these these buildings and placeswhere it just it's just one step, maybe just to get in Kennot. Let has this old,tiny. You know like these downtown fils, but we have a lot of these places that,like don't, have a ramp or um you're going ound back or I don't know,and not that could be hard. That could be really really frustrating. So ourhouse we spent a year and a half renovating this beautiful midstry home,and it's amazing. It's like you attes, something before again sure you knowyou love living here, just because your housetol is accessible. And yes, it's Imean it's incredible. You know we travel this summer a little bit. Weactually went down to Texas UM and went to Utah and t state with some friendsand even just being there with our daughter for like a week. It's reallyyou know, I I realize how wonderful and what a blessing our homeis, because it's it's hard to have a you know, have her being a spacewhere you're um her wheel, chair can't get inside either either house Um, because she has a powerbilt here, it'sover three hundred pounds, and so that's very different, even than like amanual lived here that you know, that is not the strollers. We had in NewYork, where you canr lifted up and down the stairs. This is very differentright, yes, like you need a ramp to get it into a house, and so um and evenother people with you know with manual little chairs like it would stink tohave to get out- and you know have some put you you know, take you out of yourseat and then carry the tair inside and then get you back in, but you couldancud. He couldn't even we couldn't even do that with with her her tair andso then she's scooting everywhere and then you're also, you know stuff likein in the bathrooms, like we've made them Batem super accessible for her, soshe could be really independent in theires. Sh could be independent allthroughout our house, and we just you know, mean it's spacious, 'causeagainwith a wheelchair, especially hers. It's it's heavy, but it's Aso, big manual will or parawheel chairs, justtend to be bigger and bulkier, and so youv got to watch your doorway wits andyour turning radiuses and Um. You know o having this space at's, big and open,and you know we- we have a an elevator in our chair in our house, but thenalso outside there's. You know: There's ramps to get M in the front door andthere's a ramp on the side to to go round. Oside o the House so and yeahit's like all those things are just. It makes a world of difference, and so wedo love our homes and I don't nd. It's also kind of like the anchorkeeping USS here. 'CAUSE Wewe're, like Oh yeah, real, never moving. Now we e otop now and the other thing that really sects is like. It was it's. It wasreally expensive. You know it's not Willa and that'what sucks aboutaccessble housing is that it's hard to find Um doing something customed most peoplecan't afford that no M and even a lot of people who like lovetheir homes, but maybe they have lik. You know, then they have one of theirkids who's born witha, a disability and that they need a wheel. Tun E got totry to add something on o know. Had Ha mom reach out to me and a facelook gripthat I'm on and she was Kindof askedg me about this and she was like yeahwewant to do an eddition but they're talking about some luxury tax and we'relike Hllos as our daughter he's, distabled and so she's, like Ou Owdo,you know of any like tax break, but you know S, I I don'teven know like 'cause, you k. We were doing the whole house from scratchanyway, so I you know we weren't doing specifically just you know to add on toit, but on top of that, it's like you know you have to think of these tee TA.These things aren't things that...

...insurance helps with insurance, doesn't help you getanaccessible ban. You know, that'sanother thing that that is really.You know: EICTLY N you're, not o cities, but it's like accessibilitis, expensive,yes and not available to everyone. Like you were saying t yeah, you know I havea good friend who's, Um, actually someoni interviewed on my spotlight andshe's a wheelchair user, and I think she said she spent like eight months onhouse hunting in her hometown when she was moving out and trying to live onher own tried to find a place that was accessible, a d in the end she stillhad to have like a ramt built up to the front stairs but, like you know, eight months, 'causeeverything is either super super like if it's cheap, there's like a two orthree year waiting list, man anthe. What about the people who have twoweeks to move and they have to play the place 'cause, Theye Ben, like they or it's O. It's like super, expensiveand custom, and now that's so anyway. We're grateful and we're lucky. Butit's it's. I know it's not something everyone can do. anress part of thefrustration definitely will amy, I'm so greatfully youere willing to you knowto chat with me about some of these things. That's been wonderful, I knewit would be you're so awesome. I is so fun th,Litty Gie funds and, of course, we're going to end with a game. You Know Me, yes, so here's what we're going to do.I gave you a little bit of heads up 'cause. I needed you to come up withtwo Trivia questions that you don't know the answer to and that I might- orI might not know the answer to right. So what 'm going to do is you're goingto ask yours and I'm GOINGTO, ask Mine and we are going to try and guess, ifthe other person's bluffing and we won't really know because we don't knowthe answer and then we'll look 'em up after so so I will go first. I will askyou one and then yet, if you don't know the answer, you kind o have to play itoff like you do oh, I know this and then just make up an answer on the flyso at it's hard onot to tell if you're bluffing or not so it's kind of a testto see how good you are at bluffing on the fly, which is really hard to do.Actually. Yeah Yeah, okay, so shis. My first question: Riady MHM, name, a probasketball player. Anyone who isn't retired- oh H, Toby Bryan, so I think he isretired. I asked coal and I might be wrong so see if you can come up withwhat else I could not hol wis laughing so hard. I could not name a singlePearo basketball player. I was like ant Forni Hardaway e Youve Nash. Like everyone I could sayI retie othing lat, Michael Jadan, yeah, always ste curry, oh, maybe not sound at Amiliar Ting is it I. I always thought it wasSteven Cury, then someon, so defiite decy, hey we're going to look it up andyou may have just pap it an answer. I'm like that kind of sounds tin here,it'll be funny. If he's actually like a chef or something I knew he's a vestal play. Okay, heyyou got that above me we're going to look up stuff, Currey,that's purse! You may have gotten that right. Okay! So now you ask me one:okay, Um, who wh Mineis? Also a sports question on. I tell you: It tells you alittle bit about weave what we doer Joana, who one the the world serieslast year, which tro o actually know this it was. It was the giants San Francisco giants.Oh really, yes, are you just making that Ubsaye? Well, that's what you haveto guess. Am I bluffing or not, and I didn't say force- I totally assumedthat you had really come up with that name and if not I'm very impressed'cause. I do not think you were blessing. I think you know really thinkStef Carysa basketball player Bla, I'm so impressed. So now now youguess, for me, am I blessing about the giants? Um? No, you know they went ohNice. I am Habyi, I'm not even sure if the giants are Attun in San Franciscothat right. That sounds like it might be right, though, but if the giants won,I feel like it was maybe several years ago. So it's going to get interesting check,but maybe I'm right. Okay. So here is your second question name and amino acid. Oh Gosh, we were just talking about Moasidthe other night you're going to be able to think of one.I can feel it m vinegar. Oh, that actually might beaccurate. As you know, I had to ask you somethingI don't know. I cannot name inamino acid and maybe VINEGRA UNFORTUN, I'mgeting it a Afh Bush it for you. It might me rain Ti. So I'm going to see your bleffing akind of guessing and bluffing is a...

...little bit the same. In this case Iyeah yeah. I don't know now. Asit is I now I feel Ik were atall complicated scientific names. Oh so it was firturo. BLEFT 'cause youweren't talking about them. You were laughing about that. Yes, I like itcould be vinegar, but I was blessn ys, the bluff for sure. Okay, ask your lastquestion: Aven, the beaver is the national enblem of which country. Ohyes, I know this too. It is Norway. I can't believe I knew both of Yours M.I must say you're lying Ta, a Gon, not lying bluffing amytheres a die thatblatn. Oh a hundred percent. I have no idea. Orit so now we're going to go, gothem and I'm first looking up stuff, curry Stephen Curry, pointguard for theGolden State Warriors you go an so got and I kindo got at Yo 'cause. I thoughtthat you really did know that and that you weren't bluffing, so we're bothrank world series Wen two thousand andeighteen was the Boston red sox. I was totally wrong. I was totally wrong too,but on that I wasn'trlly Ti. Get me on that BLUF. I really thought Ye wa. NowI e o. She seems like she really does know, but then it was too obvious withthe Norway one 'cause I kindo a like. I know this Society Nan Yeah. Okay, solet's see amino acids, we've got. Oh, where is the list of AMENO ACIDS? Tistodine Izoas? She he's seen LizineI've heard of that one MEPHEWONINE, Vanilla Lemine, so the Ro Minnic rerfan I've heard of trip to fan too that's ANIMANASA. I don't vineger thatwouldhave been amazing if it were ust like Yallingulmy, galen, irol s,vinegar, the JE is vinegar. Enemy Olassid is vinegar and Amino CID, likeit might be, an acid, was probably not inrais. Ra Vinegar is he combination ofAcetic, acid and water made by a two SOMFERMA fermentation process. So yougot that it's an acid so, but I'm impressed at least that you were ableto bluss something tha acid range. Tismen is the national emblem of Canada,Oh good. To now that makes sense. I should have guessed Canada did you know that entor you were Lik,it nobuddies. I actually. I actually just had to look up like Triviaquestions, and then you could like go perfect and e would hire the answer andas I go, that's a good one. When I was thinking of the questions I was like, Icould ask her to name a pro bowler, but then it was like it's Goit to besomething that she might know that the average person might know. I no thinkhe hould find very many people who could name a pro bowler, so I wentbasketball hilariously. I could not name a single one, that's hilarious!That is clarious. I liked that game. That was not bad. That was good thot.It was fun. Thank you again for being here amy today it was so fun chiningwith you. You too, thank you. agry all right, we'll talk to you later, what a great interview so good to hear:Amy's voice, Avery great job amy thanks for coming things for participating. Wereally appreciate your insight and lot of fun. It was funny we were talkingearlier about how nice it is to have a garage now, but in the middle of theinterview you got home from a dentists, appointment and the garage opened andyou a her it so loud in the background, and then you left for work, and youcould hear it again and I'm curious if anyone listening to it well hear t thatgarage opening and think that's their garage opening and someone of gettinghome at their house. TES O hear the garage opening the background. That'sjust me subtly interrupting ARY's interview. Your garage is not openingright now, especially if you're in listening to this is you're trying togo to sleep at Tweve, odfive garage to so en that'd be that'd, be pretty bad. So acouple of notes that I wanted to hit on. Obviously the interview itself:Fantastic in regards to disability awareness, really cool things there,but I'm seeing some trends here with the Games that you're playing M CanadaAfanada seems to be an overarching theme. I love Canada. Well, I mean, aswe all do, but you've got the it was the Canadian prime minister. It wasalso the the beaver was the had no idea symbol or something of Canada. I was. Iwas telling this to a friend the other night. I went out with a friend and hewas asking how the podcast was going. He says: Yeah Oreba brought up Canada,but she didn't give me a shout out, so I'm not going to see your name friendbut consider this th, the shoutout for you and for the whole nation of H, aalo,Canadian friend, and all the Canadians and all of our Canadian listeners andreaders, because you can be a listener and a reader ad. Clearly I need tobrush up on my Canadian Tribia so for anyone out there who is not aware ofwhat amy does online do yourself? A...

...favor go to instagram and follow her atthis little Miggi, that's M. I ggy really entertaining. I have a love,hate relationship with instagram stories. Most of the time I just skipand skip and skip 'cause I like having my inboss, but you ar O amy fames, areso en I'm kind of embarrassed to admit that and she's probably listening tothis, but I for every time I look at goed garden lest so o here too, it's soentertaining go out and she she does some really cool things there, O thanksOgain for listening, see you next time.

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